Student Collage

It’s all about the stuff.

Student Collage

Each discipline has its own pleasures and pains.  Dancers have the joy and simplicity of using only their bodies as the medium of their work, while bearing the burden of a need for constant maintenance and discipline of that tool.  Visual art is necessarily material in nature.  Even art created digitally requires the artist’s physical interaction with keyboards, mice, graphics tablets, screens, etc.  We have the joy of messing with STUFF – our interaction with the world is visual and haptic.  We are the children who terrified our parents in places with fragile and expensive merchandise.

But this handling and manipulating comes at a price.  To teach art is to share this joy of creating with students, but every day is a process of design and construction followed by cleaning and redesigning.  A friend and former teacher once told me that half of his job was custodial work.  In my own career I have spent hours washing paint out of ice trays with a water hose behind the school, collected enough paper scraps to repopulate the thinned forests of South America, and spent countless hours cutting, collating, folding, tearing, arranging, etc. etc. etc.

Every day is like a dinner party.  You spend hours getting ready so that some people you like will come and enjoy what you have made.  Then they go away and leave you to clean up the mess.

Ocean Habitat-1I just finished working with a great group of second graders on a series of lessons that involved making little habitat installations.  We built forms out of paper bags and masking tape, covered them in papier mache, painted them to suit a variety of habitats and added bodies of water, created vegetation with paper sculpture, then populated the habitats with animals modeled out of clay or model magic.  The results are really nice, but it’s easy not to realize that for every hour I spent with the classes, at least two happened outside of class.

The products demonstrated students’ understanding of the habitats they had researched, but just as important was their exploration of the different kinds of materials we dealt with, and from my perspective in my role here at the university it was an opportunity to give that experience to a group of second grade classroom teachers as well.  These four ladies took up that challenge quite well.

DSC08091Now the project is complete.  I did a little repair work yesterday on a few animals who needed surgery, and today, I’m heading over to take photos of the completed works.  The really daunting part now is re-organizing my supplies in the aftermath of the project.  The dishes are in the sink.  Now I have to roll up my sleeves and get to work.

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